Excerpt & Giveaway: The Quest to the Uncharted Lands by Jaleigh Johnson

THE QUEST TO THE UNCHARTED LANDSThe Quest to the Unchartered LandsAmazon/B&N/iBooks/TBD/Goodreads

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From the acclaimed author of the New York Times bestseller The Mark of the Dragonfly comes another magical and thrilling story that takes readers on an exciting new adventure.

Stella Glass dreams of exploring worlds beyond her home of Solace, but when her famous parents are sent on a historic mission to the Uncharted Lands, it’s simply too dangerous for her to join them. By order of the king, she is left behind.

Missing out on the excitement is one thing, but Stella is devastated at the thought of her parents flying into the unknown. So she takes matters into her own hands. Instead of staying with family as planned, she steals away and–right before takeoff–sneaks aboard the airship.

But Stella isn’t the only stowaway. In the cargo bay is a boy who is also desperate to get to the Uncharted Lands. And someone else who’s determined to keep the ship from making it there at all. . . .

Excerpt

This was it. All her weeks of planning, lying awake at night for hours, worrying over the details she might have missed, wondering if, when the moment came, she would actually have the skill and courage to pull this off, or if she would be caught and forced to stay behind.

No, she wouldn’t let that happen. Her parents were setting off on a journey into unknown territory. She had to go with them.

Because how would she bear it if they never came back?

The matches shook in Stella’s hands. She closed her eyes and forced down the sudden panic that swept over her. It’s all right, she told herself. Pretend this is nothing more than an experiment in the lab. Follow the steps—one by one. Everything was in place. She just had to strike the match and begin.

Opening her eyes, Stella felt a veil of calm settle over her. She lifted her hands and struck the match, and with a crackle, a bright flame sprang to life in front of her eyes. Before she could change her mind, she touched it to the fuse.

A bead of orange engulfed the string and started to burn. Stella jumped to her feet, running to the next one, and the next. When all four fuses were lit and burning toward the smoke bombs, she stuffed the matches into her alchemy case and moved quickly out of the grove

and across the palace lawn, careful to hurry but not run.

In her head, she began to count. From the experiments she’d conducted, she judged that she had about forty seconds before the smoke grew thick enough to attract someone’s attention. Forty seconds   to weave through the crowd and get to the ship.

Now thirty. Twenty.

With ten seconds left in her count, a scream tore through the humid afternoon air.

“Fire! Someone, help! Fire!”

Stella sped up her pace. One by one, faces in the crowd began turning from the ship toward the grove. To keep up appearances, and because she wanted to see how visible the smoke screen was, Stella turned with them. A jolt of satisfaction went through her when she saw the thick gray clouds twisting toward the sky, obscuring the speared tips of the cypress trees.

More panicked shouts rang out, the crowd ahead of her thinning as people either ran toward the smoke or tried to back away to a safe distance. Palace guards shoved people aside as they ran toward the imaginary fire.

Stella turned back to the ship. The way was suddenly clear in front of her. The laborers who’d been loading cargo had gone to help put out the fire. There wasn’t a guard in sight to block her way or a chamelin watching from the sky. Her stomach pitched, but Stella forced her

feet to keep moving, counting her steps in her head.

One.

She reached the rope line barring everyone from the ship.

Two.

She ducked under, rising to her feet on the other side. Three.

The cargo bay of the ship loomed before her, dozens of crates still arranged in neat piles on the lawn. Casting one last furtive glance around her, Stella ran up the gangplank and into the dark belly of the ship.

The Iron Glory, flagship of the Dragonfly territories

and symbol of its fragile peace with the Merrow Kingdom, was going to be the first vessel in Solace history to make it across the Hiterian Mountains to the uncharted lands.

And Stella Glass wasn’t letting her parents go without her. She would be the first stowaway to see what was waiting on the other side of that range.

OTHER BOOKS BY THE AUTHOR 

The Mark of The DragonflyAmazon/B&N/iBooks/TBD/Audible/Goodreads

[STAR] “This magnetic middle-grade debut . . . [is] a page-turner that defies easy categorization and ought to have broad appeal.”

Publishers Weekly, Starred
 
[STAR] “Heart, brains, and courage find a home in a steampunk fantasy worthy of a nod from Baum.”

Kirkus Reviews, Starred
 
[STAR] “A fantastic and original tale of adventure and magic. . . . Piper is a heroine to fall in love with: smart, brave, kind, and mechanically inclined to boot.”

School Library Journal, Starred
 
A complex and impeccably developed plot—there is plenty to recommend in this novel.”

The Bulletin
 
Appealing characters and lots of action make it a good choice for young adventure readers.”

Booklist 

Piper has never seen the Mark of the Dragonfly until she finds the girl amid the wreckage of a caravan in the Meteor Fields. The girl doesn’t remember a thing about her life, but the intricate tattoo on her arm is proof that she’s from the Dragonfly Territories and that she’s protected by the king. Which means a reward for Piper if she can get the girl home. The one sure way to the Territories is the 401, a great old beauty of a train. But a ticket costs more coin than Piper could make in a year. And stowing away is a difficult prospect–everyone knows that getting past the peculiar green-eyed boy who stands guard is nearly impossible. Life for Piper just turned dangerous. A little bit magical. And very exciting, if she can manage to survive the journey.

SECRECTS OFAmazon/B&N/iBooks/TBD/Audible/Goodreads

An engaging world rich in detail, mayhem, and adventure…All aboard for fantasy lovers with a dual penchant for girl power and keeping up with the Indiana Joneses.”

Kirkus Reviews

From Jaleigh Johnson, the acclaimed author of the New York Times bestseller The Mark of the Dragonfly, comes another thrilling adventure in the magical world of Solace.
   

Lina Winterbock lives in the mountain strongholds of Solace. She’s an apprentice to the archivists, the wise men and women whose lives are dedicated to cataloging, studying, and preserving the objects that mysteriously fall from the sky in the scrap towns.
   

Lina should be spending her days with books, but the Iron War has changed everything. The strongholds are now a refuge, and the people Lina once counted on no longer have time for her, so she spends her days exploring the hidden tunnels and passages of her home. The strongholds are vast and old, with twisting paths, forgotten rooms, and collapsed chambers, some of them containing objects that have been lost and forgotten even by the archivists.
   

And in one of the forgotten chambers, Lina discovers a secret.
   

Hidden deep in a cavern is a half-buried airship like nothing she has ever seen before. She’s determined to dig it out and restore it. But Lina needs help, and she doesn’t know anyone she can trust with her secret.

Then she meets Ozben, a mysterious boy who has a secret of his own—a secret that’s so dangerous it could change the course of the Iron War and the world of Solace forever. 

authorJaleighWebsite | Twitter | Facebook | Goodreads | Instagram

Jaleigh Johnson is a fantasy novelist living and writing in the wilds of the Midwest.  Her middle grade debut novel The Mark of the Dragonfly is a New York Times bestseller, was chosen for the ABA 2014 Spring Indie Next list, and was named one of Amazon’s Top 20 Children’s Books of 2014.  Her other books in the Solace series from Delacorte Press include The Secrets of Solace and The Quest to the Uncharted Lands.  She has also written several novels and short stories for the Dungeons and Dragons Forgotten Realms fiction line published by Wizards of the Coast.  Johnson is an avid gamer and lifelong geek, and in her spare time she also enjoys traveling, reading, baking, and going to movies with her husband.  Visit her online at www.jaleighjohnson.com.  Photo credit: Mark Jones.

giveaway

3 winners will receive a finished copy of THE QUEST TO THE UNCHARTED LANDS, US Only.

   a Rafflecopter giveaway

Week Two:

6/26/2017- YA Book Madness- Excerpt

6/27/2017- Book-Keeping- Review

6/28/2017- Bibliobakes- Review

Week Three:

7/3/2017- The Desert Bibliophile- Review

7/4/2017- Savings in Seconds- Review

7/5/2017- Jrsbookreviews- Review

7/6/2017- Two Chicks on Books- Interview

7/7/2017- Seraphina Reads- Excerpt

 

Happy reading,

Jordan

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ARC Review & Giveaway: Breaking by Danielle Rollins

BREAKINGbreakingGoodreads/Amazon/B&N/TBD/iBooks

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Companion novel to Burning.

Prep school gets a twist of supernatural suspense in this commercial YA thriller.

Charlotte has always been content in the shadow of her two best friends at the prestigious Underhill Preparatory Institute. Ariel is daring and mysterious. Devon is beautiful and brilliant. Although Charlotte never lived up to the standards of the school—or her demanding mother—her two best friends became the family she never had. When Ariel and Devon suddenly commit suicide within a month of each other, Charlotte refuses to accept it as a coincidence. But as the clues point to a dangerous secret about Underhill Prep, Charlotte is suddenly in over her head. There’s a reason the students of Underhill are so exceptional, and the people responsible are willing to kill to protect the truth…

Suspenseful and scintillating, with hints of the supernatural, this fast-paced thriller will keep readers hooked.

review

***I received this eARC as a gift in exchange for an honest review via NetGalley & Bloomsbury USA Children’s

***Triggers violence and suicide. Animal cruelty.

HERE’S WHAT I LOVED:

  • The dark and gritty, almost fairy tale-like quality of Ariel, Devon, and Charlotte. It almost read like magical realism with a sci-fi twist. I adored the dreamy, twisted idea of them being archetypes of fairy tale princesses whose mothers either abandoned or neglected them and all they had was a sisterhood. Yes, that. Yes. 
  • The characters are imperfect. In fact, they aren’t even really likable for the most part. The more Charlotte reminisces about Devon and Ariel, the more cruel and sadistic they seem. Some scenes are truly horrific and disturbing. Like if you love animals…one scene will give you some serious anxiety. I held my breath through that one. The anticipation and fear are too real. Charlotte is one of those characters that you sort of sympathize with, though she does have quite a bit of self-pity. She thinks she’s less attractive, less intelligent, etc., than everyone at her school. There is a total of one scene that shows where that insecurity comes from-the pretty much abusive mind games her mother forced her to play as a child. I wasn’t entirely sold on her character. She was okay. As the story progressed, she did get better. She became rebellious, angry, and a little vicious. Not everything was so black and white. 
  • Mystery definitely propels the plot forward. What at first seems like a string of suicides becomes suspect. What made two girls who were relatively happy and popular kill themselves? There are all sorts of clues and weird incidents that make you question everything. 
  • The ending. Violent, vengeance-fueled, incendiary 😉 it’s sort of evil, but also justified. It was deeply satisfied with the ending. 

HERE’S WHAT I DISLIKED: 

  • The romance. There is so much build up that makes you think it’s something it’s totally not. Something more. Maybe Charlotte is blinded. Whatever. But the reader can see. There’s chemistry sure. And lust, definitely. But anything else, I wasn’t getting any strong emotions, even before the numbness started to set in. 
  • I read Burning. There were several references to things that happened in this book that it kept throwing me off and I flipping through my memory trying to remember anything that might be relevant to the story. There is SO little about what happened in Burning and as a companion where the events that happened in the first book directly influence major plot points, I felt like there should have been more than a few measly clues. 
  • The pacing was a little slow for me. It did pick up but way, way towards the end. Then it’s just crazy action and violence and all sorts of chaos. 

authorDanielle (1)

Amazon/B&N/TBD/iBooks/Goodreads

Author of the best-selling MERCILESS series, SURVIVE THE NIGHT, BURNING, and BREAKING. I’m currently working on the last installment of the Merciless books, & starting a new series to be announced later this year.

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Enter for your chance to win a finished copy of Breaking. US ONLY.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Read more, 

Jordan

ARC Review: Dreadnought by April Daniels

dreadnoughtGoodreads/Amazon/B&N/iBooks

“The shelter of boyhood ended, and they called me a young man. For no reason at all, they looked at the things that felt right to me, and they took them.

Even down to the way I carry my books and cross my legs. They took it. They took everything. Puberty came, and my body turned on me, too. Watching every part of myself I liked rot away one day at a time, the horrified impostor staring back at me. Watching the other girls, the ones who they let be girls, head in the other direction.

Every day, torn away further from myself, chained down tighter. Suffocated. Strangled.

They’ll make a man of me. Show me how to be a man. Teach me to man up by beating me down.

They never ask if I want to be a man.”

syn

Danny Tozer has a problem: she just inherited the powers of the world’s greatest superhero. Until Dreadnought fell out of the sky and died right in front of her, she was trying to keep people from finding out she’s transgender. But then her second-hand superpowers transformed her body into what she’s always thought it should be. Now there’s no hiding that she’s a girl.

It should be the happiest time of her life, but between her father’s dangerous obsession with curing her girlhood, her best friend suddenly acting like he’s entitled to date her, and the classmate who is secretly a masked vigilante, Danny’s first weeks living in a body that fits her are more difficult and complicated than she could have imagined.

She doesn’t have much time to adjust. Dreadnought’s murderer, a cyborg named Utopia, still haunts the streets of New Port City. If Danny can’t sort through the confusion of coming out, master her powers, and stop Utopia in time, humanity faces extinction.

review4 Stars 

***I received this eARC as a gift in exchange for an honest review via NetGalley & Diversion Books

+++Potential triggers: violence, verbal abuse

With a classic superhero fix that would do Marvel proud and a protagonist that speaks from the heart, Dreadnought is the book you didn’t know your soul needed, but it answered just the same. 

Sometimes the world is a bleak and terrifying place and so much seems hopeless. All we can do is fight through the darkness and stand strong in our convictions. Dreadnought is that quintessential story. The world can be a cruel place for those who are different and humanity can leave a lot to be desired. Dreadnought is a story of strength, hope, and perseverance, of embracing what you know in your heart and not letting anyone tell you different, despite the adversity and fear. 

Danny (Danielle) Tozer has lived her life in a body she feels betrayed her. I’ve never had such a keen insight into a character and their emotions. Danny’s story reflects the boxes that our sex puts us in, the way that society pushes and crafts each child into perceived ideas of masculinity and femininity. Danny has always known she was female, despite being anatomically male. She talks about how she gradually was pushed out of a circle of girls that she was friends with, how she was pushed into sports, and what she was expected to act like to assume the role of a male. My heart broke a little more with each loss, because that’s what they are deaths. It didn’t matter if Danny wanted to hold her books is a “girly” way, she was criticized for being too feminine and forced to adjust even the smallest of her mannerisms for fear of reprimand, even if part of her was dying inside with each small defeat. It’s eye-opening. How many times are people dismissive? How many times do people say, what’s the big deal, it’s a choice, what’s it matter, just hold your books differently? When you’re hit with Danny’s emotions and how it’s slowly killing her inside to relinquish even the tiniest bit of herself to satisfy society’s need to dichotomize, it cuts deeply. It’s powerful and insightful and will make you see the world differently. A transgender superhero. This makes my heart happy.

Dangerous forms of masculinity and femininity are summarized in Danny’s parents. I felt sick and disgusted by the way Danny’s father treats her and the way her mother cowers. The verbal abuse is gut-wrenching. There are all sorts of abuse and words can be just as painful and damaging as physical blows. I felt rage and hatred, and so sad for Danny. All she wants is to be accepted for who she is and the people who are supposed to love her unconditionally cast her aside. 

Throw in randomly gaining a superhero mantle on top of all this emotional turmoil. Obviously the adrenaline and emotions are high. The Legion is full of a diverse cast of superheroes that are both memorable, occasionally prejudiced, and super interesting. 

Calamity. I LOVE HER. She’s a little clichéd, but that’s her schtick. She’s funny, reckless, smart, and daring. The way she accepts Danny right off the bat and befriends her is sort of serendipitous and heartwarming. 

That being said, the world building was iffy. There were details just thrown in as explanation. Things weren’t clearly defined. They were more broad than anything. 

Utopia’s plan for domination is creative and she’s complex as a villain. However, all of these plot points were piled on at once and a little much. There’s not much spacing. The reveal too was so in your face that it didn’t pack the punch it could have. Some of the action scenes were too step-by-step and lasted an abnormally long time. Not in the sense that they dragged, because the description was epic, but you kind of wanted them to hurry up so we could get to the next catastrophe. 

If you like any of the following, you’ll enjoy this:

Thrilling reading, 

Jordan

100+ YA Books of 2017

I’ve set out to compile a definitive list of every highly anticipated YA release coming this year. I will update as I hear about them. If you have anything you’re super excited about that’s not on the list, please comment and I will add!!!

Because my Goodreads goal was a fail last year, I’ve decided to tackle this list PLUS my 2017 challenge. So far that’s 165 books and counting. 

I’ve included Goodreads links and their release month. 

***Once I’ve read and reviewed them, I will include the link to said review and put a star next to the title. 

 

  1. 10 Things I Can See From Here by Carrie Mac (Feb)
  2. 27 Hours by Tristina Wright (Oct)
  3. #famous by Jilly Gagnon (Feb)
  4. A Tragic Kind of Wonderful by Eric Lindstrom (Feb)* Review
  5. After the Fall by Kate Hart (Jan)* Review
  6. Aftercare Instructions by Bonnie Pipkin (Jun)*
  7. Allegedly by Tiffany D. Jackson (Jan)
  8. Always and Forever, Lara Jean by Jenny Han (Jun)
  9. Ashgrave by S.M. Boyce (Sept)
  10. At the Edge of the Universe by Shaun David Hutchinson (Feb)*
  11. Bang by Barry Lyga (Apr)* Review
  12. The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden (Jan)* Review
  13. Because of the Sun by Jenny Torres Sanchez  (Jan)* Review
  14. Beautiful Broken Girls by Kim Savage  (Feb)* Review
  15. Before She Ignites by Jodi Meadows (Sept)
  16. The Black Tides of Heaven by J.Y. Yang (Aug) 
  17. The Black Witch by Laurie Forest  (May)
  18. The Blood Rose Rebellion by Rosalyn Eves (Mar)* Review

  19. The Bone Witch by Rin Chupeco (Mar)*
  20. The Book Jumper by Mechthild Glaser (Jan)
  21. Brave New Girl by Rachel Vincent  (May)
  22. By Your Side by Kasie West (Jan)
  23. Caraval by Stephanie Garber (Jan)
  24. The Careful Undressing of Love by Corey Ann Haydu (Jan)* Review
  25. Carlos’ Peace by Melissa Haag (Feb)

  26. Carve the Mark by Veronica Roth (Jan)
  27. Charmsprings by S.M. Boyce (Oct)
  28. Cheating Death by April White (Jan)

  29. City of Saints & Thieves by Natalie C. Anderson (Jan)*
  30. A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas (May)
  31. The Crown’s Fate by Evelyn Skye (May)
  32. A Crown of Wishes by Roshani Chokshi (Mar)
  33. The Cruelty by Scott Bergstrom (Feb)* Review
  34. Curiosity and the Sentient’s Oblation by Zachary Paul Chopchinski (Feb)* Review
  35. The Cursed Queen by Sarah Fine (Jan)
  36. Dark Breaks the Dawn by Sara B. Larson  (May)
  37. The Dark Days Pact by Allison Goodman (Jan)
  38. Daughter of the Pirate King by Tricia Levenseller (Feb)
  39. Dear Reader by Mary O’Connell  (May)
  40. Deathdread by S.M. Boyce (Oct)
  41. Definitions of Indefinable Things by Whitney Taylor (Apr)
  42. Defy the Stars by Claudia Gray  (Apr)
  43. Done Dirt Cheap by Sarah Nicole Lemon (Feb)
  44. Dreadnought by April Daniels (Jan)* Review
  45. Dreamfall by Amy Plum (May)
  46. Dreamland Burning by Jennifer Latham (Feb)
  47. Duels & Deception by Cindy Anstey (Apr)
  48. The Edge of the Abyss by Emily Skrutskie (Apr)
  49. The Edge of Everything by Jeff Giles (Jan)
  50. The Education of Margot Sanchez by Lilliam Rivera (Feb)*
  51. Empress of a Thousand Skies by Rhoda Belleza (Feb)* Review
  52. The Ends of the World by Maggie Hall (Jul)
  53. Even the Darkest Stars by Heather Fawcett (Sept)
  54. Exo by Fonda Lee (Jan)
  55. Fire Color One by Jenny Valentine (Jan)* Review
  56. The Five Daughters of the Moon by Leena Likitalo (Jul)
  57. Flame in the Mist by Renee Ahdieh (May)
  58. Forest of a Thousand Lanterns by Julie C. Dao (Oct)
  59. Freeks by Amanda Hocking (Jan)* Review
  60. Frostblood by Elly Blake (Jan)* Review
  61. The Gatlon School for Vigilantes by Marissa Meyer  (Nov)
  62. Gem & Dixie by Sara Zarr (Apr)
  63. The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee (Jun)
  64. Genuine Fraud by E. Lockhart (Sept)
  65. Get it Together, Delilah by Erin Gough (Apr)
  66. Gilded Cage by Vic James (Feb)* Review
  67. Girl on the Verge by Pintip Dunn  (Jun)
  68. Girl Out of Water by Laura Silverman (May)
  69. Give Me a K-I-L-L by R. L. Stine (Apr)
  70. Given to the Sea by Mindy McGinnis (Apr)

  71. A Good Idea by Cristina Moracho (Feb)
  72. Goodbye Days by Jeff Zentner (Mar)
  73. The Grave Keepers by Elizabeth Byrne (Sept)
  74. Grit by Gillian French (May)
  75. Happily Ever After by Kelly Oram (Feb)

  76. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (Feb)
  77. Haven by Karen Lynch (May)

  78. The Heartbeats of Wing Jones by Katherine Webber (Jan)
  79. The Hearts We Sold by Emily Lloyd Jones (Aug)
  80. History is All You Left Me by Adam Silvera (Jan)
  81. Honestly Ben by Bill Konigsberg (Mar)
  82. House of Furies by Madeleine Roux  (May)
  83. How to Break a Boy by Laurie Devore (Jan)
  84. How to Make a Wish by Ashley Herring Blake (May)
  85. The Inexplicable Logic of My Life by Benjamin Alire Sáenz (Mar)
  86. Heartstone by Elle Katharine White (Jan)
  87. The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett by Chelsea Sedoti (Jan)
  88. Hunted by Meagan Spooner (Mar)
  89. I Believe in a Thing Called Love by Maurene Goo (May)
  90. If Birds Fly Back by Carlie Sorosiak (Jun)
  91. In a Perfect World by Trish Doller  (May)
  92. It’s Not Like It’s a Secret by Misa Sugiura (May)
  93. Juniper Lemon’s Happiness Index by Julie Israel  (Jun)
  94. Kill All Happies by Rachel Cohn (May)
  95. King’s Cage by Victoria Aveyard (Feb)
  96. The Last Harvest by Kim Liggett (Jan)
  97. The Last Magician by Lisa Maxwell (Jul)

  98. The Last of August by Brittany Cavallaro (Feb)
  99. Legion by Julie Kagawa (Apr)
  100. Lessons in Falling by Diana Gallagher  (Feb)
  101. The Library of Fates by Aditi Khorana (July)
  102. Life in a Fishbowl by Len Vlahos (Jan)* DNF
  103. Lifers by M.A. Griffin (Apr)

  104. A List of Cages by Robin Roe (Jan)* Review
  105. Little & Lion by Brandy Colbert (Aug)
  106. Lois Lane: Triple Threat by Gwenda Bond (May)
  107. Long May She Reign by Rhiannon Thomas  (Feb)
  108. Looking for Group by Rory Harrison (Apr)
  109. Love and First Sight by Josh Sundquist (Jan)* Review
  110. Love Interest by Cale Dietrich (May) 
  111. Mad Miss Mimic by Sarah Henstra (May)
  112. Madness by Zac Brewer  (Sept)
  113. Mask of Shadows by Linsey Miller (Sept)
  114. Meg & Linus by Hanna Nowinski (Apr)
  115. A Million Junes by Emily Henry (May)
  116. The Names They Gave Us by Emery Lord (May)
  117. Noteworthy by Riley Redgate (May)
  118. Now I Rise by Kiersten White  (Jun)
  119. Obsidian and Stars by Julie Eshbaugh (Jun)
  120. Once and for All by Sarah Dessen (Jun)
  121. One Dark Throne by Kendare Blake (Sept)
  122. The One Memory of Flora Banks by Emily Barr (Jan)
  123. One of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus (May)
  124. Our Dark Duet by Victoria Schwab (Jun)
  125. Our Own Private Universe by Robin Talley (Jan)
  126. Perfect 10 by L. Philips (Jun)
  127. Poison’s Kiss by Breeana Shields (Jan)* Review
  128. Pretty Fierce by Kieran Scott (Apr)
  129. A Psalm for Lost Girls by Katie Bayerl (Mar)
  130. Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde (Mar)
  131. Radio Silence by Alice Oseman (Feb)
  132. The Radius of Us by Marie Marquardt (Jan)* Review
  133. Ramona Blue by Julie Murphy (May)
  134. Renegade Red by Lauren Bird Horowitz (Mar)
  135. Roar by Cora Carmack (June)
  136. Ronit & Jamil by Pamela L. Laskin (Feb)
  137. RoseBlood by A.G. Howard (Jan)* Review
  138. Royal Bastards by Andrew Shvarts (Jun)
  139. Saints, Misfits, Monsters, Mayhem by S. K. Ali (Jun)
  140. Seeking Mansfield by Kate Watson (May)
  141. Shimmer and Burn by Mary Taranta (Aug)
  142. The Ship Beyond Time by Heidi Heilig (Feb)
  143. Song of the Current by Sarah Tolcser (Jun)
  144. Speak Easy, Speak Love by McKelle George (Sept)
  145. Speak of Me As I Am by Sonia Belasco (Apr)
  146. Spindle Fire by Lexa Hillyer (Apr)
  147. Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor (Mar)
  148. Stranger Than Fanfiction by Chris Colfer (Mar)
  149. The Suffering Tree by Elle Cosimano  (Jun)
  150. Tash Hearts Tolstoy by Kathryn Ormsbee (Jun)
  151. There’s Someone Inside Your House by Stephanie Perkins (Aug)
  152. They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera (Sept)
  153. This Beats Perfect by Rebecca Denton (Feb)
  154. The Tiger’s Daughter by K. Arsenault Rivera  (Oct)
  155. Traitor to the Throne by Alwyn Hamilton (Mar)
  156. Traitor’s Kiss by Erin Beaty (May)
  157. Under Rose-Tainted Skies by Louise Gornall (Jan)* Review
  158. The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli (Apr)
  159. The Valiant by Lesley Livingston (Feb)
  160. Vigilante by Kady Cross (Mar)
  161. Warcross by Marie Lu 
  162. Wayfarer by Alexandra Bracken (Jan)
  163. We Are Okay by Nina LaCour (Feb)* DNF
  164. When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon (May)
  165. Wicked Like a Wildfire by Lana Popovic (Aug)
  166. Wild Beauty by Anna-Marie McLemore (Sept)
  167. Wildman by J. C. Geiger (Jun)
  168. Windfall by Jennifer E. Smith (May)
  169. Windwitch by Susan Dennard (Jan)
  170. Wintersong by S. Jae-Jones (Feb)*
  171. Wires and Nerve by Marissa Meyer (Jan)
  172. Wispvine by S.M. Boyce (Sept)
  173. Wonder Woman: Warbringer by Leigh Bardugo (Aug)
  174. The X-Files Origins: Agent of Chaos by Kami Garcia (Jan)* Review
  175. The X-Files Origins: Devil’s Advocate by Jonathan Maberry (Jan)* Review
  176. You Bring the Distant Near by Mitali Perkins (Sept)
  177. The You I’ve Never Known by Ellen Hopkins (Jan)

Number completed: 32/177

Enjoy and as always, happy reading!

Jordan

#Free 4/26 & 4/27: Killshot-Aria Michaels

Freepromo fence

KillshotGoodreads/Amazon

cooltext1889161239 copyWhen seventeen year old Liv Larson and her brother are sent to separate foster homes, she gives up on her old life, her old friends, and her faith in God. The only bright spot in Liv’s new life is her energetic and obnoxious foster-sister, Riley. When Riley convinces her to come to the rooftop party to view Icarus, the up-coming solar flare, Liv meets Zander. For the first time in months her troubles take a back seat…that is until what should have been a small flare, erupts into a full blown solar storm.

Now, Liv and her rag-tag group of not-quite friends must find a way to survive the sweltering heat, lingering radiation, and the mysterious virus that appears to have found an ideal host among their ranks. Alliances will be formed, and battle lines will be drawn as Liv and her new friends set out on a perilous journey to save their loved ones, find answers, and reach salvation.

But, something sinister awaits them in the dark—and it’s undeniably connected to Liv.

Will Liv be able to keep her promise and reunite with her brother? Will her brave determination be enough to save them all from a rogue government, a terrifying virus, and the things that go bump in the night?

…Or was Icarus, indeed, the KILLSHOT.

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***I received this book in exchange for an honest review via the author

Killshot is the action-packed, post-apocalyptic thrill ride you’ve been searching for. It’s gritty, violent, and full of enough gore and suspense to keep you on your toes. A heart-stopping journey into a dangerous new world that takes on dystopian without going zombie, Killshot blends science fiction with natural disaster and astronomically bad luck.

For more of this review –>Killshot Review

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PICK THIS UP IF YOU LOVE DYSTOPIA, YA, ACTION, ADVENTURE

Pleasant reading,

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