ARC Review: Blood Will Out by Jo Treggiari

35390436Goodreads/Amazon/B&N

“That’s scary for a boy if he’s not willing to man up. Expectations are heavy. It’s like sticking a mirror in front of his soul.”

synAri Sullivan is alive—for now.

She wakes at the bottom of a cistern, confused, injured and alone, with only the shadowy recollection of a low-pitched voice and a gloved hand. No one can hear her screams. And the person who put her there is coming back. The killer is planning a gruesome masterpiece, a fairytale tableau of innocence and blood, meticulously designed.

Until now, Ari was happy to spend her days pining for handsome, recent-arrival Stroud Bellows, fantasizing about their two-point-four-kids-future together. Safe in her small hometown of Dempsey Hollow. But now her community has turned very dangerous—and Ari may not be the only intended victim.

review2.5/5 Stars

***Trigger warnings for graphic violence, animal abuse, gore

What I liked:

  • The story started in a really engaging and mysterious way. We know that the main character wakes up injured and terrified, with no memory of how she got there and no way of getting out. 
  • The killer’s POV has tremendous back story and is ridiculously graphic. You truly gain insight into the crazed mind of this serial killer-how the proclivities developed, the transformation from minor fixation to full-blown obsession. It’s both sickening and fascinating. 
  • A twist that was so unexpected, I’m not sure that what I thought was the twist wasn’t actually a twist within a twist. By the end, I was still uncertain. 

What I disliked:

  • Despite the rollercoaster of a start, the pacing was slow. I skimmed through page after page, where there was so much unnecessary detail that it extended scenes for pages that should have been much shorter. The sentence structure was also weird and oddly scientific. 
  • SO MUCH GRAPHIC VIOLENCE. If you are an animal lover, steer far, far away. If you are at all queasy when it comes to blood, slicing, dissection, anything of that nature, quickly step away from this book and don’t look back. 
  • The main character is dull. Predictable. Makes some choice decisions that will leave you wanting to throw things across the room. When the reveal comes where you find out how Ari ended up in the cistern, it’s really no surprise with her poor decision-making skills. Completely naive and judgmental to her detriment. Also explosive anger, crude and misogynistic insults. 

Read your heart out, 

Jordan

 

 

ARC Review & Giveaway: One of Us is Lying by Karen M. McManus

ONE OF US IS LYING (1)One Of Us Is LyingAmazon/B&N/TBD/iBooks/Audible/Goodreads

syn

The Breakfast Club meets Pretty Little Liars, & One of Us Is Lying is the story of what happens when five strangers walk into detention and only four walk out alive. Everyone is a suspect, and everyone has something to hide.

Pay close attention and you might solve this.

On Monday afternoon, five students at Bayview High walk into detention.

Bronwyn, the brain, is Yale-bound and never breaks a rule.

Addy, the beauty, is the picture-perfect homecoming princess.

Nate, the criminal, is already on probation for dealing.

Cooper, the athlete, is the all-star baseball pitcher.

And Simon, the outcast, is the creator of Bayview High s notorious gossip app.

Only, Simon never makes it out of that classroom. Before the end of detention Simon’s dead. And according to investigators, his death wasn’t an accident. On Monday, he died. But on Tuesday, he’d planned to post juicy reveals about all four of his high-profile classmates, which makes all four of them suspects in his murder. Or are they the perfect patsies for a killer who’s still on the loose?

Everyone has secrets, right? What really matters is how far you would go to protect them.

review

***I received this eARC as a gift in exchange for an honest review via NetGalley & Delacorte Press

If you’re a sucker for true crime TV shows, this book will be your version of YA heaven.

Told from four alternating POVs (the murder suspects), One of Us Is Lying features fully fleshed out, complex, and interesting characters whose plots all stand on their own. So often when there are a number of characters, their stories tend to get a little lost, but this is certainly not the case here. Everything is suspect and because of that, every lie, every aspect of these four unlucky teens’ lives are sifted through and exploited. All of the characters are flawed and real. They’ve made mistakes and the worst (best?) part is that they might be paying for it. Seemingly small incidents become incendiary and inciting. The catty, pettiness of high school is on full display and motives are everywhere.

The premise is awesome. It’s simple, yet completely enthralling. You won’t stop until you know the truth.

There are tons of clues. And it’s the readers challenge to sort through and figure out what’s important. If you are even remotely into sleuthing, you’ll enjoy this story exponentially.

Twists, red herrings, romance, revenge. There’s a little bit of everything.

Because the characters are so real, it’s compelling to want to know about them. Everything from their heartaches, their fibs, their crimes, to what they’re hiding even from themselves. This unlikely foursome becomes something unexpected-friends-in the face of tragedy.

The mystery is a good one. Even if you make the right guess about what happened, odds are you’re missing some finer details that are totally unexpected and hit fast.

Occasionally, because the characters are so dimensional, the pacing is a little stunted and the story a tad sidetracked, but it always comes back around relatively quickly.

There were a handful of clichés that might bug the reader, like the catty cheerleader, the blatant sexism (at points this is called out though, which, thumbs up), but the other characters certainly redeemed themselves and the story.

authorKMcManus ColorWebsite | Twitter | Goodreads | Instagram

As a kid I used to write books when I was supposed to be playing outside, and not much has changed. I’m a marketing and communications professional who also writes Young Adult contemporary and fantasy fiction in Cambridge, MA.

When not writing or working I love to travel, and along with my nine-year old son I’ve ridden horses in Colombia and bicycles through Paris. A member of SCBWI, I hold a bachelor’s degree in English from the College of the Holy Cross and a master’s degree in Journalism from Northeastern University. Which I have never, ever used professionally.

giveaway

3 winners will receive a finished copy of ONE OF US IS LYING, US Only.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

OTHER  STOPS ON THE TOUR

5/29/2017- YA Books Central- Interview

5/30/2017- YA Book Madness- Review

5/31/2017- Novel Novice- Guest Post

6/1/2017- Literary Meanderings- Review

6/2/2017- BookHounds YA– Interview

Week Two:

6/5/2017- Storybook Slayers- Review

6/6/2017- Book Princess Reviews- Review

6/7/2017- The Cover Contessa- Interview

6/8/2017- Book Briefs- Review

6/9/2017- Pretty Deadly Reviews- Guest Post

Week Three:

6/12/2017- Eli to the nth- Review

6/13/2017- YA and Wine- Interview

6/14/2017- Smada’s Book Smack- Review

6/15/2017- The O.W.L.- Guest Post

6/16/2017- Zach’s YA Reviews- Review

Read on, 

Jordan

ARC Review: Things I Should Have Known by Claire LaZebnik

things i should have knownGoodreads/Amazon/B&N/iBooks

syn

From the author of Epic Fail comes the story of Chloe Mitchell, a Los Angeles girl on a quest to find love for her autistic sister, Ivy. Ethan, from Ivy’s class, seems like the perfect match. It’s unfortunate that his older brother, David, is one of Chloe’s least favorite people, but Chloe can deal, especially when she realizes that David is just as devoted to Ethan as she is to Ivy.

Uncommonly honest and refreshingly funny, this is a story about sisterhood, autism, and first love. Chloe, Ivy, David, and Ethan, who form a quirky and lovable circle, will steal readers’ hearts and remind us all that it’s okay to be a different kind of normal.

review

4/5 Stars 

***I received this eARC as a gift in exchange for an honest review via NetGalley & HMH Books for Young Readers

I’ve read a ton of books lately that I’ve loved, but this is the first book in maybe years that I can honestly say I’m grateful for. There are so many beautiful things that happen in this book and they’re done so well that you might not even notice until it hits like an epiphany and the biggest of those things is spreading awareness. People make assumptions and judgments about what autism is, how those who have it should function (or not) in society, and say offhand comments that are both offensive and ignorant. This book does a fabulous job of making people think about what they say and their prejudices against those who are different. Some parts are profound in their simplicity and eye-opening with the totally real and heart wrenching examples that happen in everyday life. 

What’s great about this book is that it showcases various forms of autism that show up on the spectrum. Not all autism is the same and mannerisms, behaviors, and what upsets each person is totally individual. No two cases are identical and how to cope with anxiety, sadness, and rapid mood changes varies immensely. You really have to know the person to understand. Claire LaZebnik stresses that point in the relationships between Ivy and Chloe and David and Ethan. Their parents are not as observant or patient as they could/should be and the siblings know each other best.

When Ivy or Ethan are upset, Chloe and David break through their defenses, ask them questions, and notice when they start tapping or talking louder that these are signs of distress that an outsider would not pick up on. When kids are “freaking out” in public we have a tendency to be dismissive and judgmental, to say it’s poor parenting, the child is a brat, or get angry because they’re “spoiling” your day. Several times throughout the book, Ethan and Ivy are pitied, looked down upon, and their opinions rejected because they “don’t know any better,” it made my blood boil just reading those words. There’s a scene where they’re at the bowling alley and these old ladies make comments about “them” being allowed out and whether they should use bumpers “for safety”, which could be a legitimate concern if there was a visible problem but the condescending approach, speechless. 

Ivy and Ethan are incredibly real. If you’ve ever met someone with autism, you’ll recognize the blunt, factual commentary, focus on a specific niche or activity, and trouble processing the “why” question in regards to emotions and feelings. This book will truly make you think about things you might have never considered. How does someone who may not process/understand or know how to convey their feelings deal with lust or attraction? I mean, this is so so important. If someone who has autism has questions about this, how do they know if they’re attracted to the same sex? The LGBT dimension of this book is challenging and urges the reader to question. The conversations between Ivy and Chloe are fueled by understanding and asking matter of fact questions that lead Ivy to come to her own conclusions. These are model conversations and full of so much love. 

David is an intriguing character. He’s sarcastic, cold, antisocial, and yet, there’s something about him that’s compassionate and will win your heart. The way he adores his brother and is willing to sacrifice his future for him, total swoon material. Don’t get me wrong, he’s abrasive and takes a bit to get used to, but he’s a catch. 

I wasn’t the biggest fan of Chloe. The way she let terrible comments roll off her, the way she let her boyfriend and friends say stuff about Ivy, like she was abnormal or a mistake conflicted with the understanding and love she showed her sister. At first, Chloe seemed like an opinioned, flighty, typical popular girl and I pretty much loathed her. She fought one moment and shut down to keep her hot girl status the next. She does grow as the story progresses but it takes a long, long time. 

Sometimes the pacing was slow because they focus was on the lust between Chloe and her boyfriend, which was full of semi-repulsive groping and horrible comments about Ivy and the fact that the boyfriend didn’t get enough attention because she was always helping out her sister. Just no.

If you like any of the following, you’ll enjoy this:

Keep reading, 

Jordan

 

Cover Reveal: 27 Hours by Tristina Wright

27hoursAmazon/CA/UK/B&N

Release Date: October 3, 2017

syn

Rumor Mora fears two things: hellhounds too strong for him to kill, and failure. Jude Welton has two dreams: for humans to stop killing monsters, and for his strange abilities to vanish.

But in no reality should a boy raised to love monsters fall for a boy raised to kill them.

Nyx Llorca keeps two secrets: the moon speaks to her, and she’s in love with Dahlia, her best friend. Braeden Tennant wants two things: to get out from his mother’s shadow, and to unlearn Epsilon’s darkest secret.

They’ll both have to commit treason to find the truth.

During one twenty-seven-hour night, if they can’t stop the war between the colonies and the monsters from becoming a war of extinction, the things they wish for will never come true, and the things they fear will be all that’s left.

author

Tristina Wright is a blue-haired bisexual with anxiety and opinions. She’s also possibly a mermaid, but no one can get confirmation. She fell in love with science fiction and fantasy at a young age and frequently got caught writing in class instead of paying attention. She enjoys worlds with monsters and kissing and monsters kissing. She married a nerd who can build computers and make the sun shine with his smile. Most days, she can be found drinking coffee from her favorite chipped mug and making up more stories for her wombfruit, who keep life exciting and unpredictable.

Still trying to figure out the mermaid thing.

Epic reading, 
Jordan

ARC Review: Dreadnought by April Daniels

dreadnoughtGoodreads/Amazon/B&N/iBooks

“The shelter of boyhood ended, and they called me a young man. For no reason at all, they looked at the things that felt right to me, and they took them.

Even down to the way I carry my books and cross my legs. They took it. They took everything. Puberty came, and my body turned on me, too. Watching every part of myself I liked rot away one day at a time, the horrified impostor staring back at me. Watching the other girls, the ones who they let be girls, head in the other direction.

Every day, torn away further from myself, chained down tighter. Suffocated. Strangled.

They’ll make a man of me. Show me how to be a man. Teach me to man up by beating me down.

They never ask if I want to be a man.”

syn

Danny Tozer has a problem: she just inherited the powers of the world’s greatest superhero. Until Dreadnought fell out of the sky and died right in front of her, she was trying to keep people from finding out she’s transgender. But then her second-hand superpowers transformed her body into what she’s always thought it should be. Now there’s no hiding that she’s a girl.

It should be the happiest time of her life, but between her father’s dangerous obsession with curing her girlhood, her best friend suddenly acting like he’s entitled to date her, and the classmate who is secretly a masked vigilante, Danny’s first weeks living in a body that fits her are more difficult and complicated than she could have imagined.

She doesn’t have much time to adjust. Dreadnought’s murderer, a cyborg named Utopia, still haunts the streets of New Port City. If Danny can’t sort through the confusion of coming out, master her powers, and stop Utopia in time, humanity faces extinction.

review4 Stars 

***I received this eARC as a gift in exchange for an honest review via NetGalley & Diversion Books

+++Potential triggers: violence, verbal abuse

With a classic superhero fix that would do Marvel proud and a protagonist that speaks from the heart, Dreadnought is the book you didn’t know your soul needed, but it answered just the same. 

Sometimes the world is a bleak and terrifying place and so much seems hopeless. All we can do is fight through the darkness and stand strong in our convictions. Dreadnought is that quintessential story. The world can be a cruel place for those who are different and humanity can leave a lot to be desired. Dreadnought is a story of strength, hope, and perseverance, of embracing what you know in your heart and not letting anyone tell you different, despite the adversity and fear. 

Danny (Danielle) Tozer has lived her life in a body she feels betrayed her. I’ve never had such a keen insight into a character and their emotions. Danny’s story reflects the boxes that our sex puts us in, the way that society pushes and crafts each child into perceived ideas of masculinity and femininity. Danny has always known she was female, despite being anatomically male. She talks about how she gradually was pushed out of a circle of girls that she was friends with, how she was pushed into sports, and what she was expected to act like to assume the role of a male. My heart broke a little more with each loss, because that’s what they are deaths. It didn’t matter if Danny wanted to hold her books is a “girly” way, she was criticized for being too feminine and forced to adjust even the smallest of her mannerisms for fear of reprimand, even if part of her was dying inside with each small defeat. It’s eye-opening. How many times are people dismissive? How many times do people say, what’s the big deal, it’s a choice, what’s it matter, just hold your books differently? When you’re hit with Danny’s emotions and how it’s slowly killing her inside to relinquish even the tiniest bit of herself to satisfy society’s need to dichotomize, it cuts deeply. It’s powerful and insightful and will make you see the world differently. A transgender superhero. This makes my heart happy.

Dangerous forms of masculinity and femininity are summarized in Danny’s parents. I felt sick and disgusted by the way Danny’s father treats her and the way her mother cowers. The verbal abuse is gut-wrenching. There are all sorts of abuse and words can be just as painful and damaging as physical blows. I felt rage and hatred, and so sad for Danny. All she wants is to be accepted for who she is and the people who are supposed to love her unconditionally cast her aside. 

Throw in randomly gaining a superhero mantle on top of all this emotional turmoil. Obviously the adrenaline and emotions are high. The Legion is full of a diverse cast of superheroes that are both memorable, occasionally prejudiced, and super interesting. 

Calamity. I LOVE HER. She’s a little clichéd, but that’s her schtick. She’s funny, reckless, smart, and daring. The way she accepts Danny right off the bat and befriends her is sort of serendipitous and heartwarming. 

That being said, the world building was iffy. There were details just thrown in as explanation. Things weren’t clearly defined. They were more broad than anything. 

Utopia’s plan for domination is creative and she’s complex as a villain. However, all of these plot points were piled on at once and a little much. There’s not much spacing. The reveal too was so in your face that it didn’t pack the punch it could have. Some of the action scenes were too step-by-step and lasted an abnormally long time. Not in the sense that they dragged, because the description was epic, but you kind of wanted them to hurry up so we could get to the next catastrophe. 

If you like any of the following, you’ll enjoy this:

Thrilling reading, 

Jordan

ARC Review: The Radius of Us by Marie Marquardt

radiusGoodreads/Amazon/B&N/iBooks

Release Date: Jan 17, 2017

syn

What happens when you fall in love with someone everyone seems determined to fear?

Ninety seconds can change a life — not just daily routine, but who you are as a person. Gretchen Asher knows this, because that’s how long a stranger held her body to the ground. When a car sped toward them and Gretchen’s attacker told her to run, she recognized a surprising terror in his eyes. And now she doesn’t even recognize herself.

Ninety seconds can change a life — not just the place you live, but the person others think you are. Phoenix Flores-Flores knows this, because months after setting off toward the U.S. / Mexico border in search of safety for his brother, he finally walked out of detention. But Phoenix didn’t just trade a perilous barrio in El Salvador for a leafy suburb in Atlanta. He became that person — the one his new neighbors crossed the street to avoid.

Ninety seconds can change a life — so how will the ninety seconds of Gretchen and Phoenix’s first encounter change theirs?

Told in alternating first person points of view, The Radius of Us is a story of love, sacrifice, and the journey from victim to survivor. It offers an intimate glimpse into the causes and devastating impact of Latino gang violence, both in the U.S. and in Central America, and explores the risks that victims take when they try to start over. Most importantly, Marie Marquardt’s The Radius of Us shows how people struggling to overcome trauma can find healing in love.

review

5/5 Stars 

***I received this eARC as a gift in exchange for an honest review via NetGalley & St. Martin’s Griffin

Do you ever so thoroughly enjoy yourself that you get lost, completely consumed in the moment, and forget everything else in the world? In that period of time, nothing else matters, it’s just you and that utter bliss that is safety, warmth, and contentment. This is that feeling in book form. I don’t think I’ve ever had such a joyful reading experience. This story is beautiful and heartbreaking and reaches into the depths of your soul and asks you to open your eyes, to truly see people past their surface value. There is so much, so many moments that will leave you feeling so full of love and like you can float away on a cloud. At the same time, there’s this crushing sense of dark reality and despair. What Phoenix and Ari went through…it’s enough to break anyone and yet, it’s a reality for so many people in this world. It’s not okay. This will be an experience for some readers, one of learning and opening up to the world around you. Sometimes there is so much bad in the world that it’s easy to forget about the good, but always, even when the odds are slim, there is hope. 

The Radius of Us deals with so many current issues-gang violence, asylum seekers, immigration, PTSD, racial issues, and how the system treats people from specific countries. There’s a mix of court proceedings that give you a broad, but poignant picture of detention centers, how people who show up at the border are treated, the agony and fear when they separate adults from their little ones, the role of parole officers, and how much money it costs to fight for your safety. There’s also a little about the groups that advocate for asylum seekers from countries that are considered high risk. Sometimes we live our lives in a bubble and we become so wrapped up that we forget about what others go through, how they have to fight for the right to live peacefully, safely. This reality hits and it hits hard. 

Gang violence plays a key role in this story. It’s terrifying and brutal. It’s not especially graphic. There are short, abrupt, and blunt scenes that suggest enough without the gore and others that will leave you feeling shaken and sickened. How gangs work, their conditioning processes, what membership means, and what you must suffer to get out are here in brief, but it’s totally enough to understand without getting too specific. From El Salvador to Guatemala to Mexico, each system is different and come with threats.

This book is fantastically diverse in the best way. It calls the characters and the reader out on their perceptions and prejudices. It many ways, it crushes stereotypes. 

Love is a major theme. What love can inspire, how it can keep you holding on when everything falls apart and dares you to hope; it gives you something to live for, just knowing other people want you around is enough to move mountains. There are all forms of love in this story: love between siblings, between relatives, strangers, friends. So much love it leaves you breathless and keyed up. Happy.

Secondary characters. Many times they fade out or fall flat but these characters, you will love them in their own right. They’re memorable, unique, full of life, laughter, heart, and compassion. I loved Bo and Barbie. I mean a tattooed biker couple helping ex-cons remove tattoos from their past. Just wow. They’re gruff and funny and just wonderful characters. So are Phoenix’s guardians. An elderly lesbian couple so in love and with so much to give to a complete stranger. Seriously this story will restore your faith in humanity. 

PTSD comes in all shapes and sizes. Trauma can cause all sorts of debilitating side effects and take over the victim’s life. Ari and Gretchen both suffer different forms. The portrayal of each is so raw, so real, you feel every ounce of panic, fear, and memory.

Ari and Phoenix. I didn’t realize it, but I’ve been dreaming of a story with a strong sibling bond. This story delivers. Phoenix risks everything, literally his life several times for his brother’s safety, to protect him from gang recruitment and all the pain he went through as a kid forced to join. I mean months through Central America in horrific conditions. Death, violence, and evil all around them. Phoenix tried to protect his brother the best he could, nothing mattered but getting him out, even if Phoenix died in the process. That kind of love, that’s something unbreakable. This alone will make you fall for Phoenix. He’s selfless, compassionate, and loves fiercely. There’s nothing he wouldn’t do. The scenes of Ari and Phoenix together are bittersweet. There are laughs, but there are also tears, seeing Ari the way he is, so traumatized he’s unable to speak. I mean it kills him. I think my heart broke a hundred times in as many pages. 

Gretchen’s story also has to do with gang violence. Her whole life was altered by one moment. Everything she used to be was gone, obliterated by an act of violence that made her scared, that left her with memories that crushed her and caused her to fold in on herself and sacrifice a normal life. And yet, Gretchen offers comfort and kindness to everyone she meets. She gives so much of herself without realizing it. What she does for Phoenix with barely a thought-she’s a genuinely good person. 

Phoenix’s story. I’m struggling to find the words for that kind of hardship and sadness. Sometimes there are only two choices and both are bad. Sometimes your surroundings shape your future and you have no choice but to become something dark to save the light in your life-in this case Ari and his grandmother. Phoenix’s past haunts him. He feels guilty. Like he’s a terrible person despite all the good. He has no kindness for himself, only regret and it’s like being suckerpunched in the heart. 

Gretchen and Phoenix. While I wasn’t exactly happy about how and why they met-because wow that is not okay but it is addressed in the story-they’re perfect for each other. They soothe and comfort, they complete one another. They’re in sync. Their radius is the same. There’s chemistry and resistance and such heated tension. You might want to throw the book waiting for them to happen. 

I honestly could go on forever about the merits and awesomeness that is The Radius of Us but this is probably the longest review I’ve ever written. Just do yourself a favor. Read this. Give it as a gift. It’s worth every minute. 

author

Marie Marquardt is an author of young adult novels, a college professor, and an immigration advocate. Her debut novel, Dream Things True (St. Martin’s Press), was a 2015 YA BEA Buzz Panel choice praised in Kirkus as a “worthy examination of undocumented immigration in the American South through the lens of young love.” Her second novel, THE RADIUS OF US, will be published by St. Martin’s Press in January 2017. Uplifting and hopeful, THE RADIUS OF US reflects the experience of Latin American teenagers fleeing gang violence and seeking asylum in the United States and the possibilities for change. It’s an issue that Marie Marquardt cares about profoundly, and she believes that connecting to it emotionally it can be a powerful antidote to the hate, fear, and misunderstanding that plagues our society.

“When I speak to groups about immigration and the need for immigration reform, I can offer clear, rational explanations and data on why our immigration system needs to be repaired,” Marquardt says. “But they only begin to care when they meet and get to know someone who is stuck in between. Writing a fictional (but very real) story brings readers into intimate, personal engagement with a messy, complicated, political situation.”

Dr. Marquardt is a Scholar-in-Residence at Emory University’s Candler School of Theology and has been an advocate for social justice for Latin American immigrants in the South for two decades. She has published many articles and co-authored two non-fiction books on the issues involved and has been interviewed on National Public Radio, Public Radio International, and BBC America, among many other media outlets. She is also the co-chair of El Refugio, a Georgia non-profit that serves detained immigrants and their families.

Marie Marquardt is a proud member of the We Need Diverse Books team and lives in a busy household in Decatur, Georgia with her spouse, four children, a dog and a bearded dragon.

For more information, visit: http://www.mariemarquardt.com http://candler.emory.edu/faculty/profiles/marquardt-marie.html

Follow her on Twitter: @MarieFMarquardt

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mariemarquardtauthor.

If you like any of the following (really if you like any book in the world, really) you’ll enjoy this:

Read on, 

Jordan

100+ YA Books of 2017

I’ve set out to compile a definitive list of every highly anticipated YA release coming this year. I will update as I hear about them. If you have anything you’re super excited about that’s not on the list, please comment and I will add!!!

Because my Goodreads goal was a fail last year, I’ve decided to tackle this list PLUS my 2017 challenge. So far that’s 165 books and counting. 

I’ve included Goodreads links and their release month. 

***Once I’ve read and reviewed them, I will include the link to said review and put a star next to the title. 

 

  1. 10 Things I Can See From Here by Carrie Mac (Feb)
  2. 27 Hours by Tristina Wright (Oct)
  3. #famous by Jilly Gagnon (Feb)
  4. A Tragic Kind of Wonderful by Eric Lindstrom (Feb)* Review
  5. After the Fall by Kate Hart (Jan)* Review
  6. Aftercare Instructions by Bonnie Pipkin (Jun)*
  7. Allegedly by Tiffany D. Jackson (Jan)
  8. Always and Forever, Lara Jean by Jenny Han (Jun)
  9. Ashgrave by S.M. Boyce (Sept)
  10. At the Edge of the Universe by Shaun David Hutchinson (Feb)*
  11. Bang by Barry Lyga (Apr)* Review
  12. The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden (Jan)* Review
  13. Because of the Sun by Jenny Torres Sanchez  (Jan)* Review
  14. Beautiful Broken Girls by Kim Savage  (Feb)* Review
  15. Before She Ignites by Jodi Meadows (Sept)
  16. The Black Tides of Heaven by J.Y. Yang (Aug) 
  17. The Black Witch by Laurie Forest  (May)
  18. The Blood Rose Rebellion by Rosalyn Eves (Mar)* Review

  19. The Bone Witch by Rin Chupeco (Mar)*
  20. The Book Jumper by Mechthild Glaser (Jan)
  21. Brave New Girl by Rachel Vincent  (May)
  22. By Your Side by Kasie West (Jan)
  23. Caraval by Stephanie Garber (Jan)
  24. The Careful Undressing of Love by Corey Ann Haydu (Jan)* Review
  25. Carlos’ Peace by Melissa Haag (Feb)

  26. Carve the Mark by Veronica Roth (Jan)
  27. Charmsprings by S.M. Boyce (Oct)
  28. Cheating Death by April White (Jan)

  29. City of Saints & Thieves by Natalie C. Anderson (Jan)*
  30. A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas (May)
  31. The Crown’s Fate by Evelyn Skye (May)
  32. A Crown of Wishes by Roshani Chokshi (Mar)
  33. The Cruelty by Scott Bergstrom (Feb)* Review
  34. Curiosity and the Sentient’s Oblation by Zachary Paul Chopchinski (Feb)* Review
  35. The Cursed Queen by Sarah Fine (Jan)
  36. Dark Breaks the Dawn by Sara B. Larson  (May)
  37. The Dark Days Pact by Allison Goodman (Jan)
  38. Daughter of the Pirate King by Tricia Levenseller (Feb)
  39. Dear Reader by Mary O’Connell  (May)
  40. Deathdread by S.M. Boyce (Oct)
  41. Definitions of Indefinable Things by Whitney Taylor (Apr)
  42. Defy the Stars by Claudia Gray  (Apr)
  43. Done Dirt Cheap by Sarah Nicole Lemon (Feb)
  44. Dreadnought by April Daniels (Jan)* Review
  45. Dreamfall by Amy Plum (May)
  46. Dreamland Burning by Jennifer Latham (Feb)
  47. Duels & Deception by Cindy Anstey (Apr)
  48. The Edge of the Abyss by Emily Skrutskie (Apr)
  49. The Edge of Everything by Jeff Giles (Jan)
  50. The Education of Margot Sanchez by Lilliam Rivera (Feb)*
  51. Empress of a Thousand Skies by Rhoda Belleza (Feb)* Review
  52. The Ends of the World by Maggie Hall (Jul)
  53. Even the Darkest Stars by Heather Fawcett (Sept)
  54. Exo by Fonda Lee (Jan)
  55. Fire Color One by Jenny Valentine (Jan)* Review
  56. The Five Daughters of the Moon by Leena Likitalo (Jul)
  57. Flame in the Mist by Renee Ahdieh (May)
  58. Forest of a Thousand Lanterns by Julie C. Dao (Oct)
  59. Freeks by Amanda Hocking (Jan)* Review
  60. Frostblood by Elly Blake (Jan)* Review
  61. The Gatlon School for Vigilantes by Marissa Meyer  (Nov)
  62. Gem & Dixie by Sara Zarr (Apr)
  63. The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee (Jun)
  64. Genuine Fraud by E. Lockhart (Sept)
  65. Get it Together, Delilah by Erin Gough (Apr)
  66. Gilded Cage by Vic James (Feb)* Review
  67. Girl on the Verge by Pintip Dunn  (Jun)
  68. Girl Out of Water by Laura Silverman (May)
  69. Give Me a K-I-L-L by R. L. Stine (Apr)
  70. Given to the Sea by Mindy McGinnis (Apr)

  71. A Good Idea by Cristina Moracho (Feb)
  72. Goodbye Days by Jeff Zentner (Mar)
  73. The Grave Keepers by Elizabeth Byrne (Sept)
  74. Grit by Gillian French (May)
  75. Happily Ever After by Kelly Oram (Feb)

  76. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (Feb)
  77. Haven by Karen Lynch (May)

  78. The Heartbeats of Wing Jones by Katherine Webber (Jan)
  79. The Hearts We Sold by Emily Lloyd Jones (Aug)
  80. History is All You Left Me by Adam Silvera (Jan)
  81. Honestly Ben by Bill Konigsberg (Mar)
  82. House of Furies by Madeleine Roux  (May)
  83. How to Break a Boy by Laurie Devore (Jan)
  84. How to Make a Wish by Ashley Herring Blake (May)
  85. The Inexplicable Logic of My Life by Benjamin Alire Sáenz (Mar)
  86. Heartstone by Elle Katharine White (Jan)
  87. The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett by Chelsea Sedoti (Jan)
  88. Hunted by Meagan Spooner (Mar)
  89. I Believe in a Thing Called Love by Maurene Goo (May)
  90. If Birds Fly Back by Carlie Sorosiak (Jun)
  91. In a Perfect World by Trish Doller  (May)
  92. It’s Not Like It’s a Secret by Misa Sugiura (May)
  93. Juniper Lemon’s Happiness Index by Julie Israel  (Jun)
  94. Kill All Happies by Rachel Cohn (May)
  95. King’s Cage by Victoria Aveyard (Feb)
  96. The Last Harvest by Kim Liggett (Jan)
  97. The Last Magician by Lisa Maxwell (Jul)

  98. The Last of August by Brittany Cavallaro (Feb)
  99. Legion by Julie Kagawa (Apr)
  100. Lessons in Falling by Diana Gallagher  (Feb)
  101. The Library of Fates by Aditi Khorana (July)
  102. Life in a Fishbowl by Len Vlahos (Jan)* DNF
  103. Lifers by M.A. Griffin (Apr)

  104. A List of Cages by Robin Roe (Jan)* Review
  105. Little & Lion by Brandy Colbert (Aug)
  106. Lois Lane: Triple Threat by Gwenda Bond (May)
  107. Long May She Reign by Rhiannon Thomas  (Feb)
  108. Looking for Group by Rory Harrison (Apr)
  109. Love and First Sight by Josh Sundquist (Jan)* Review
  110. Love Interest by Cale Dietrich (May) 
  111. Mad Miss Mimic by Sarah Henstra (May)
  112. Madness by Zac Brewer  (Sept)
  113. Mask of Shadows by Linsey Miller (Sept)
  114. Meg & Linus by Hanna Nowinski (Apr)
  115. A Million Junes by Emily Henry (May)
  116. The Names They Gave Us by Emery Lord (May)
  117. Noteworthy by Riley Redgate (May)
  118. Now I Rise by Kiersten White  (Jun)
  119. Obsidian and Stars by Julie Eshbaugh (Jun)
  120. Once and for All by Sarah Dessen (Jun)
  121. One Dark Throne by Kendare Blake (Sept)
  122. The One Memory of Flora Banks by Emily Barr (Jan)
  123. One of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus (May)
  124. Our Dark Duet by Victoria Schwab (Jun)
  125. Our Own Private Universe by Robin Talley (Jan)
  126. Perfect 10 by L. Philips (Jun)
  127. Poison’s Kiss by Breeana Shields (Jan)* Review
  128. Pretty Fierce by Kieran Scott (Apr)
  129. A Psalm for Lost Girls by Katie Bayerl (Mar)
  130. Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde (Mar)
  131. Radio Silence by Alice Oseman (Feb)
  132. The Radius of Us by Marie Marquardt (Jan)* Review
  133. Ramona Blue by Julie Murphy (May)
  134. Renegade Red by Lauren Bird Horowitz (Mar)
  135. Roar by Cora Carmack (June)
  136. Ronit & Jamil by Pamela L. Laskin (Feb)
  137. RoseBlood by A.G. Howard (Jan)* Review
  138. Royal Bastards by Andrew Shvarts (Jun)
  139. Saints, Misfits, Monsters, Mayhem by S. K. Ali (Jun)
  140. Seeking Mansfield by Kate Watson (May)
  141. Shimmer and Burn by Mary Taranta (Aug)
  142. The Ship Beyond Time by Heidi Heilig (Feb)
  143. Song of the Current by Sarah Tolcser (Jun)
  144. Speak Easy, Speak Love by McKelle George (Sept)
  145. Speak of Me As I Am by Sonia Belasco (Apr)
  146. Spindle Fire by Lexa Hillyer (Apr)
  147. Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor (Mar)
  148. Stranger Than Fanfiction by Chris Colfer (Mar)
  149. The Suffering Tree by Elle Cosimano  (Jun)
  150. Tash Hearts Tolstoy by Kathryn Ormsbee (Jun)
  151. There’s Someone Inside Your House by Stephanie Perkins (Aug)
  152. They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera (Sept)
  153. This Beats Perfect by Rebecca Denton (Feb)
  154. The Tiger’s Daughter by K. Arsenault Rivera  (Oct)
  155. Traitor to the Throne by Alwyn Hamilton (Mar)
  156. Traitor’s Kiss by Erin Beaty (May)
  157. Under Rose-Tainted Skies by Louise Gornall (Jan)* Review
  158. The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli (Apr)
  159. The Valiant by Lesley Livingston (Feb)
  160. Vigilante by Kady Cross (Mar)
  161. Warcross by Marie Lu 
  162. Wayfarer by Alexandra Bracken (Jan)
  163. We Are Okay by Nina LaCour (Feb)* DNF
  164. When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon (May)
  165. Wicked Like a Wildfire by Lana Popovic (Aug)
  166. Wild Beauty by Anna-Marie McLemore (Sept)
  167. Wildman by J. C. Geiger (Jun)
  168. Windfall by Jennifer E. Smith (May)
  169. Windwitch by Susan Dennard (Jan)
  170. Wintersong by S. Jae-Jones (Feb)*
  171. Wires and Nerve by Marissa Meyer (Jan)
  172. Wispvine by S.M. Boyce (Sept)
  173. Wonder Woman: Warbringer by Leigh Bardugo (Aug)
  174. The X-Files Origins: Agent of Chaos by Kami Garcia (Jan)* Review
  175. The X-Files Origins: Devil’s Advocate by Jonathan Maberry (Jan)* Review
  176. You Bring the Distant Near by Mitali Perkins (Sept)
  177. The You I’ve Never Known by Ellen Hopkins (Jan)

Number completed: 32/177

Enjoy and as always, happy reading!

Jordan