Review: The Sin Eater’s Daughter by Melinda Salisbury


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A startling, seductive, deliciously dark debut that will shatter your definition of YA fantasy.

Sixteen-year-old Twylla lives in the castle. But although she’s engaged to the prince, no one speaks to her. No one even looks at her. Because Twylla isn’t a member of the court. She’s the executioner. As the goddess-embodied, Twylla kills with a single touch. So each week, she’s taken to the prison and forced to lay her hands on those accused of treason.

No one will ever love her.

Who could care for a girl with murder in her veins?

Even the prince, whose royal blood supposedly makes him immune to her touch, avoids her.But then a new guard arrives, a boy whose playful smile belies his deadly swordsmanship. And unlike the others, he’s able to look past Twylla’s executioner robes and see the girl, not the goddess. Yet a treasonous romance is the least of Twylla’s problems. The queen has a plan to destroy her enemies-a plan that requires an unthinkable sacrifice.

Will Twylla do what it takes to protect her kingdom?

Or will she abandon her duty in favor of a doomed love?

review

3.5/5 Stars

The Sin Eater’s Daughter is a dark and deadly fairy tale. Full of twists, temptation, and manipulation, The Sin Eater’s Daughter is spellbinding and different in the best way.

This cover is sinfully beautiful. 

The world building. I want to live in this twisted, dusty place full of magic and lore. I want to learn their customs, and breathe in their past. It’s like Brothers Grimm meets Sarah J. Maas. The curses, the actual act of eating people’s sins so that they can move on to the afterlife and not become a restless spirit. Absolute genius and so dark. It is reminiscent of Hayao Miyazaki’s Spirited Away. 

Twylla is resigned to her fate. She’s consumed with guilt and riddled with grief at her past. She knows that as a chosen symbol, she must make sacrifices for the good of the people, even if she’s forfeiting her heart and soul. Twylla is complex. She wades through her feelings and slaps herself in the face with hard truths. What I LOVED was that Twylla was hard on herself. When she realized her mistakes, she accepted her complacency, her fault in everything, and that in itself was empowering.

The story got lost in the complex love triangle. It became more about the romance than the original story. I wanted more of the sin eating, the death and judgment. As an executioner, there were surprisingly few deaths. It faded away too fast. This part of the story arch needed more development before it transitioned into a full-scale romance. 

That plot twist. There’s a teeny, tiny clue, but wow, it was a heartbreaking, scathing shocker. 

Characters are brutal and manipulative. Everyone has an agenda, whether it’s pure or evil. No one is what they seem. They’re layered and wear many masks. You have to decide what to take as truth.

While the Sleeping Prince was mentioned briefly as almost an afterthought, the later importance feels like a throw in at the last minute rather than a planned plot decision. That magical transition turns the story on its head and brings it back to the smoky, fairy tale that was lost in the romance. 

Twylla falls extremely fast. While there’s build up, it wasn’t enough to offset her encounters with the Prince.

If you like any of the following, you’ll enjoy this:

Magical reading, 

Jordan

 

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